Please Sign In to generate a report.

Now serving number:   1431

Sooner or later, we all get to the point where we realize that there is a lot of data in our database that is just completely bonkers.

Bonkers will help you quickly locate questionable data by identifying groups of claims in your database that are inconsistent with each other. Bonkers works by running your GEDCOM file through a battery of recursive, multipass, deep scanning algorithms designed to rat out even the most elusive errors.

Bonkers is as a free web service. Bonkers supports a special expanded GEDCOM dictionary that will recognize numerous vendor specific events and date formats giving it a distinct advantage over vendor specific consistency checkers, and makes it useable by virtually anyone with a GEDCOM file.

Configuration Options

Bonkers provides you with the ability to fine tune your results. Specifically, Bonkers allows you enable options to include additional items in your report, and allows you to configure common age and date thresholds to best match your data. All selections are preserved between sessions.

  • Show Impossibilities Only (hides improbabilities)
  • Match Alternate Given Names For Duplicate Children
  • Ignore Non-overlapping Timelines For Duplicate Children

Show Impossibilities Only The Database Analysis Report categorizes claims as impossible, improbable, or otherwise. Impossible claims are those that could not possibly happen, such as a person who has a birth date after their baptism date. Improbable claims are those that are possible but unlikely, such as a person who had children before the age of 15. Enabling this option will limit the types of claims listed in the report to impossible claims only. This can be useful when you want to focus your research in just those areas that are most problematic.

Match Alternate Given Names For Duplicate Children The Datatbase Analysis Report lists, among other things, duplicate children, that is, families who have two children with the same name. Gigatrees.com maintains a database of common alternate names. Enabling this option will use this database to find children with matching alternate names. For instance, if a family has three children, William, Bill, and Guillaume, these would all be detected as duplicates.

Ignore Non-overlapping Timelines For Duplicate Children It is not uncommon to find families who have lost a child young and then to have given the same name to a sibling who was born after the first child died. When matching duplicate children, enabling this option will not consider those siblings duplicates as long as their timelines do not overlap.

Set the age thresholds for the following items to best match your GEDCOM data. By default, the most common ages are defined.

Maximum Child Baptism Age is the maximum age at which a person was baptized or christened as a child. Adult christenings are not considered in this context.

Minimum Marriage Age is the minimum age that a person could have been married. Betrothals and Contracts are not considered in this context.

Maximum Wife's Marriage Age is the maximum age at which a woman could have been married.

Maximum Age Between Spouses is the maximum number of years of age between spouses.

Minimum Child Bearing Age and Maximum Child Bearing Age are the range of ages within which a woman could bear children.

Minimum Flourishing Age and Maximum Flourishing Age are the range of ages that a person is considered to be an adult and would be found containing adult attributes and events such as nobility titles or occupations.

Maximum Age (Life Span) is the maximum age at death of a person.

Maximum Event Age Error is the maximum error expected between an event and a person's recorded age. A common phenomenon in genealogical records results in persons being listed at the time of an event with an age that is not accurate. Making this value too narrow may prevent birth years from being estimated accurately.

Set the date thresholds for the following items to best match your GEDCOM data.

Dead if Born Before Year is the earliest year a living person could have been born, before which is considered improbable.

Dead if Married Before Year is the earliest year a living person could have been married, before which is considered improbable.

Description

The following is a list of the various conditions the Bonkers currently detects.

  • Persons born after they were baptized
  • Persons born after they were married
  • Persons born after having children
  • Persons born after they died
  • Persons born after they were buried
  • Persons born after their parent's death
  • Persons born after their parent's burial
  • Persons baptized too old
  • Persons baptized after they were married
  • Persons baptized after they died
  • Persons baptized after they were buried
  • Persons married too young
  • Wives married too old
  • Persons who are much older than their spouse
  • Persons married after they died
  • Persons married after they were buried
  • Mothers who bore children too young
  • Mothers who bore children too old
  • Parents who died before having children
  • Persons who died after they were buried
  • Persons who lived too long
  • Persons who were buried before having children
  • Persons with multiple sets of parents
  • Persons with no parents
  • Persons with only 1 parent
  • Persons whose birth dates could not be estimated
  • Misformatted dates
  • Persons with ancestral loops
  • Persons with duplicately named children
  • Unmappable Locations

When birth dates cannot be estimated, the following abbreviated codes will appear in the report to give you an indication as to why they couldn't.

  • fb = father's birth
  • mb = mother's birth
  • pm = parrent's marriage
  • b = birth
  • bp = baptism
  • sb = earliest spouses birth
  • xb = latest siblings birth
  • m = earliest marriage
  • cb = child's birth (range)
  • cm = earliest child's marriage
  • pd = latest parent's death
  • d = death
  • bu = burial
  • le = living event (range)
  • fe = flourishing event (range)
Leave A Comment

Please Sign In to comment.